Guided Walk of Eastbourne Heritage Trail

Guided Walk of Eastbourne Heritage Trail

Join the Historical Society of Eastbourne on a guided walk of the Eastbourne Heritage Trail. A guide will explain the stories of the community and its past.

The Eastbourne Heritage Trail officially opened in February 2018, and was the culmination of two years’ work by the Historical Society of Eastbourne, the Eastbourne Community Trust and other community organisations, with the support of the Eastbourne Community Board and Hutt City Council.

The trail consists of 15 display stands spaced at intervals along the waterfront between “The Village” (Rimu Street) and Korohiwa, at the south end of Eastbourne. Each display features photographs and text about a particular aspect of Eastbourne’s history.

The guided walk is on Friday, 30th October, starting at 10 am. Walkers are asked to gather outside the Eastbourne Library at 9.45 am so we can set out promptly at 10 am. The walk takes about 2 ½ hours one way, which assumes a leisurely pace and plenty of time to look at the displays and other points of interest along the way.

Photograph by Phil Benge


Booking is required (limit of 15 people). Email alicarewnz@gmail.com or phone 04 562 8880 to book.

Location: Eastbourne Library - on the corner of Rimu St and Marine Parade

Cost: Free. Koha is appreciated.

Duration: about 2 1/2 hours

Contact: alicarewnz@gmail.com, 04 562 8880

Accessibility: The Heritage Trail is all on the flat, on paved surfaces. Comfortable walking shoes, sunhat, water bottle, and a wind-proof layer are all recommended.

Historical Society Inc of Eastbourne

The Historical Society of Eastbourne was formed in 1981 with the aim of “Preserving our Past and Telling our Stories”. It currently has nearly 200 members, and organises regular meetings with a guest speaker, outings to historical places, displays of historical photos, and other events. Over the years the Society has built up an extensive collection of historical material, including photographs, documents, maps and plans, oral histories, art works and ephemera, which has become a valuable resource for researchers.

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